Teen Arts

Today was a great day. I have been feeling so down lately, but today was a great day.
Our school has a special day called Teen Arts once a year. We submit artworks, writings, and listen to people play music. It is a special day where our school artists get to share our experiences; a day where our artists share their passion. Last year was my first year at Teen arts. I shared a piece about my Tourette’s and what life was like living with it. This year, I shared (another) personal essay; mostly about accepting my TS, my complicated relationship with my mom and sister, and my manic depression. To be honest, I wasn’t confident with this piece. It was something I wrote when I was feeling very emotional and inspired, but I hadn’t planned on reading it.

Our bus came late, so we only had twenty minutes to share our creative writing pieces. After a girl a grade lower shared her amazing short story, we had five. Then, when my favorite teacher requested me to read my writing, I was ready. I spent three days thinking of this moment. It sounds too dramatic, but it’s true. I was about share a part of me no one knew. I took a deep breath and read. I stammered, a bit, but it felt like being freed from a cage. When I looked up, I saw my teachers looking at me; not crying, like last year, but smiling. As if they were proud. On the other hand, I did make some of my friends cry. (My good friend who hates crying, cried. It was a little funny, because we hugged–which she hates doing, tooso many times, and started laughing as she continued to cry while doing so.) They came up to me and hugged me for thirty minutes, and I couldn’t have been more appreciative of them. They couldn’t fully understand what I was going through, but they were there for me-and that meant something.

Having Tourette Syndrome and depression is hard. But it helped me realize how much my father tried to make me happy; how supportive the people around me are, and of course it helps me grow stronger every day. Even in difficult times, my mental illness helps me realize my mistakes and become a better person. Today, I felt happiness shine on my friends and I as we pranced under the sun. Through tears and smiles, we walked together.

2017 NJCTS Youth Scholarship Award Essay: “How Tourette Syndrome has Played a Role in My Life”

This is the essay I submitted to the NJ Center for Tourette Syndrome & Associated Disorders (NJCTS) for their 2017 Youth Scholarship Award contest.

DavidC

A major obstacle I had to overcome, and I still deal with, is having Tourette Syndrome. When I started sixth grade, my parents noticed the twitches and grunts continuously emitting from my eyes, mouth and arms, when I watched television. I knew something was wrong long before, but never said anything. I would be in class and my tics annoyed and worried classmates who sat near me. “Is that you?” they would ask. For a long time, I was self-conscious of my actions and hated how there was nothing I could do to stop it. When school got harder, the tics got worse. I also had trouble reading passages in textbooks. My eye doctor said my right eye was weaker than my left, so I had a delayed sensory. I compensated for this by re-reading passages until I understood the text. My doctor said what should have taken 30 minutes to read, would take me up to two hours. It made sense to me, because I studied for long periods of time at home, and often went for extra help before, during and after school. It wasn’t until my junior year that my parents had me classified. The designation allowed me to get extra time for tests and other support. I’m proud that despite the Tourrette, I took AP and High Honors classes and was able to maintain a 4.0 GPA throughout high school. I was able to overcome this disability with sheer will and support from my family, teachers, and friends.

Having a steady hand is crucial in a drawing, but I also know that doing something I enjoy limits the impact of my Tourettes. It’s amazing, but, when I’m drawing I never experience tics. I love to draw and I love creating art. I want to be able to work more with both of those passions and become an animator.

As a child, I loved watching cartoons. That is how my passion for animation and the arts started. I have found what I want to do and that is to become an animator for a major studio or television network and create my own cartoon series. Even with my disorder and my late start in art, I was still able to apply, and get to accepted, to three amazing art schools. They are Ringling College of Art and Design, Savannah College of Art and Design and California College of the Arts. I still have not decided yet where I would like to go, but I know the disorder will still be there. However I will be there too fighting everyday to make sure my dreams can come true and that I can achieve whatever I want. I did it before with my grades in middle school and high school, and I will do it again in college and in the future when I do become an animator. No matter where I end up, my faith makes me confident that I will find success.

 

2016 NJCTS Youth Scholarship Award Essay

This is the essay I submitted to the NJ Center for Tourette Syndrome & Associated Disorders (NJCTS) for their 2016 Youth Scholarship Award contest. I hope you enjoy it!

I have had TS all my life, and it has affected me all my life, even though I may not have known what it was until more recent years. Knowing that I have Tourette Syndrome gave me a sense of identity, and a group of people to belong to. More importantly, it gave me direction and even more reason to create. I have always prided myself in being an artist, in particular a photographer. Being diagnosed with TS has given me a need to create and provide good representation for those with TS. I feel as if I need to prove to the world that I’m not some crude video on YouTube for people to laugh at, I am a remarkable human being that can create something beautiful out of anything. Having Tourette Syndrome has its good days and its bad days, and even on those bad days I can be reminded to keep on going and keep on ticking because TS makes me, me. I am the most important thing I could ever have. Tourette Syndrome showed me that while things can be uncontrollable, wild, and unpredictable, there is always a place for you to belong. TS has taught me that you have to be willing to go with the flow, and that not everything has a reason, which I believe that is one of the most valuable things you can learn going into adulthood. Accepting things as they are will always be a benefit to you, especially with something like Tourette Syndrome.

Changing lives with “The Space Between You And Me”

The Space Between You And Me is a powerful art installation that moves people who experience it. It’s a captivating exhibit, managing to express what it’s like to have Tourette Syndrome through footage of interviews with youth with TS and interpretive dance inspired by the disorder, all projected onto a series of transparent and semi transparent screens and mirrored in various reflective materials.

At a recent exhibition attended by hundreds of students, one teenager said that The Space Between You And Me had “changed her.” Evidence of the profound effect this project has on teenagers can be found in a blog on the official project website, where teens share their own inspired thoughts and feelings on a range of issues.

Why does The Space Between You And Me strike such a chord with teenagers? No doubt it has something to do with the installation’s theme, and the special young person who sparked its creators. From the official website:

Paige Tomashewsky, the teen who inspired the creation of the project, suggested the title for The Space Between You And Me. Paige’s TS has forced her at times to keep a space between herself and others for their protection. Students always left a space around her at assemblies and in line-ups. Although she always understood the need for this, it was still very painful.

Even given theses boundaries she has a lot of friends who know the price of being in her space but they willingly accept it. The space is the physical and emotional gap that TS creates for Paige. Sometimes it is to protect her from people’s judgments or to protect others from the dangers her tics can cause. Continue reading

Unveiling Tourette Syndrome and revealing its artistic intelligence

As part of Philly Fringe, Band of Artists will present “Tourettes: A Dancing Disorder” at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, September 7 and 8, and the Painted Bride Art Center at 230 Vine Street in Philadelphia. It also will appear at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, September 14 and 15 at the Main Stage Theatre of the Spruance FineArts Center at Arcadia University, located at 450 South Easton Road in Glenside, Pennsylvania.

Band of Artists, a unique multidisciplinary group of forward-thinking performers and presenters, unveils the artistic intelligence of Tourette Syndrome in modern dance, music, interactive lecture and Q&A.

Group founder Sutie Madison, who has had Tourette since age 8, explores the fluid boundaries between creative expression and health-event by choreographing out of the tics, twitches and vocalizations of the condition. In the safe space of performance, audiences are invited to gaze without awkwardness, learn about Tourette and question definitions of art and disability.

The Philadelphia Live Arts Festival and Philly Fringe were originally founded in 1997 as the Philadelphia Fringe Festival. Today, the Live Arts Festival serves as a series of selected cutting-edge, boundary-breaking performing arts events, created by some of the most renowned contemporary artists from our region and around the world. The Fringe serves as a collective home for artists bringing their work to audiences in every conceivable form — in traditional and untraditional venues, using new artistic forms and established ones, breaking rules or refining them.