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What’s A Tic? Part 2 — Tic Classifications

What Are Tics

There are different classifications for tics, motor vs. vocal (Do you do it with you muscles or with your voice?) and simple vs. complex (How many muscles groups are involved in the movement?) As I said in part 1 of this 3-part series, there are all different kinds of tics, so many that there isn’t a definitive list of what can be a tic and what can’t. Why? Because every person’s body and brain is different. This means the tics his brain comes up with will be different from those of his neighbor with tics.

I created this table based on information from Mayo ClinicTouretteSyndrome.net, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and StrokeTSA-USA (one of the leading support groups for individuals with Tourettes in the United States), and my own personal experience:

Common Tics

The tics listed here are some of the more common tics found in people with Tourette. My first tic was blinking, which was then followed by throat clearing, Squeaking, and my lip touching tic. My tics showed up as many tics do. Rapid, repetitive blinking is seems to be considered the most common first tic that shows up in children with Tourette Syndrome or tic disorders.

There are more extreme versions of tics that can be found in more severe cases, however. Probably the most popular one is Coprolalia, or the infamous swearing tic, where individuals who suffer from this particular tic can blurt out socially and culturally inappropriate words and phrases. There are a few things to know about Coprolalia, however:

  1. Coprolalia is found in only 10% of people with Tourettes, according to Live Science’s article, “Why Does Tourette’s Make People Curse Uncontrollably?” (I’ve heard 5%-15% from other sources as well.)
  2. Live Science also says that Coprolalia is said to be caused by some form of neurological damage, although we’re not sure why yet. It can also be found in individuals with
  3. The individuals who do suffer from this disorder don’t do it for attention or fun. In fact, it can be highly embarrassing when it does occur, and as with other tics, must be treated with care and kindness.

Because Tourette Syndrome (and tic disorders) are on a spectrum, the severity of tics will differ in individuals. My Tourettes is fairly mild so my tics are generally manageable with good diet, exercise and self-taught management techniques. There are some individuals, however, who have symptoms so severe they interfere with safety and health, such as this young man here:

Medical Miracle Tourettes

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