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Why one size doesn’t fit all when it comes to ADHD

There’s often a pattern when it comes to the many different treatments of ADHD. Each one shows improvement in some children, but not in all. Each treatment needs to be carefully regulated by parents and pediatricians to make sure none of the treatments overlap in a way that could be dangerous to the child. Some of these treatments target specific symptoms of ADHD, but not the others.

These precautions, in conjunction with the different forms of ADHD, mean one thing: there is no one “cure” for ADHD because there is no one expression of ADHD. Each child’s treatment will depend on all sorts of factors such as:

  • Type of ADHD
  • Health
  • Allergies
  • Learning Style
  • Other Disabilities
  • Safety at Home
  • Good Nutrition

And this list is by no means exclusive. My point is that it’s not fair for parents to be judged for not trying a new “miracle cure.” The children I’ve worked with in different schools and in tutoring generally thrive under multiple sources of assistance. Some of the management strategies may surprise you, too. Most benefit from a mix of medication, a balanced diet, and these non-medical treatment sources:

  • Exercise – In the article, “Taking Away Recess Bad for ADHD Kids, Experts Say,” Thomas Lenz, an associate pharmacy professor at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska,  says that exercise and ADHD medications act on the brain in very similar ways. In addition, according to NOVA’s article, “The Science of Smart: A Surprising Way To Improve Executive Function,” exercise is one of the best ways to improve executive function struggles, a symptom most children with ADHD struggle with.
  • An Organized Home – Children with ADHD often struggle to pick up basic organizational skills and habits such as having one spot for homework or knowing how to follow a basic evening routine. ADDitude Magazine’s article, “Help Your ADHD Child Organize Homework,” stresses that it’s important for parents to work with their children to develop healthy organizational skills as they grow so they’re more prepared to carry those skills into the world with them.
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) – CBT is often an effective treatment for individuals with OCD, but experts are finding that it can be helpful for children with ADHD as well. U.S. News Health’s article,  “Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Can Help With ADHD,” says, “CBT for children with ADHD is aimed largely at improving their behavior through praise and rewards that motivate them to calm down enough to cope with school or other challenges.” The article states that while CBT won’t cure ADHD, it helps children learn thinking and self-management skills. If mastered, these skills can last far beyond any medication.

Different Kids, Different Needs

Parenting a child with ADHD is not an easy task by any means. It’s time consuming all the time, and it takes a lot of trial and error. A certain diet and medication that works for one child will probably not work for the next. And on top of that, children’s dosages and treatments will need to constantly change as their bodies and brains grow.

If you’re the parent of a child with ADHD, don’t let people guilt you into only one form of management for your child. No matter how much they promise you “just need this one treatment,” odds are that your child will have his or her own needs that are mixed and multifaceted. The best you can do is try, and when one treatment doesn’t work, don’t consider yourself a failure. Simply move on to the next and know that you’re doing your best. Your attempts to meet your children’s needs will encourage his or her teachers and other supporting adults to do the same, and as a team, you’re giving your kiddo the best chance he’s got. And isn’t that what every parent wants?

Do you have experience with ADHD management? What are you thoughts on the issue? What was successful for your, or what wasn’t? Please share your thoughts in the Comment Box below. And don’t forget, you can sign up for my newsletter for extra resources on neurological disorders, education, and spiritual encouragement. As always, thanks for reading!

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3 Comments

  1. ,” exercise is one of the best ways to improve executive function struggles, a symptom most children with ADHD struggle with. My child has these anger periods

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