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Trade Secrets of a Tourette Syndrome Doctor

Dr. TaneliPresenter: Tolga Taneli, MD
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Dr. Taneli spoke about his insights on getting physicians to collaborate together about a case. He also spoke of the drug approval process. He also gave tips on ways to involve the school in the collaboration process.

Comments(6)

  1. NJCTS says

    After listening to you, I think we should seek out psychological services for the 2 brothers of our TS child. But I’m not sure exactly what I should be looking for. Can you give us any guidance.

    • Dr.Taneli says

      Depends: Some parents begin to recognize similar symptoms in siblings and need a TS specialist. For “therapy” or to begin exploring possible impact on siblings, such as stress, first ask the TS provider for an informal opinion about what might be going and what resources are best. Step-two is to find a provider and again, the TS provider’s contacts are a good place to start. Those who have an “insurance roster of providers” could look for a “child therapist” who typically have degrees in psychology, social work, or counseling (Psy.D., Ph.D., LCSW…)

      (In response to: “After listening to you, I think we should seek out psychological services for the 2 brothers of our TS child. But I’m not sure exactly what I should be looking for. Can you give us any guidance.”)

  2. NJCTS says

    It seems lately that doctors are intent on typing into their computers during our appointment. They hardly look at us, let alone look at materials we might bring. Your thoughts and any suggestions on how to improve that situation short of “firing” the doc.

    • Dr.Taneli says

      I am aware of the trend and frankly, it bothers me, as well. It does take some humanity out of care, approximating a vending machine transaction. You may want to practice language that could be well received: “Before you begin typing your note, could you review…?” or “I am aware of the time pressure, but could you hear me out on this one?”

  3. NJCTS says

    I’m a little hesitant on how to handle a situation with the school when they are suggesting I should start meds for my child in 5th grade who has some moderate tics.

    • Dr.Taneli says

      I would try to figure what bothers them so? Are there vocal tics that are disruptive? Are motor tics making to much noise, for example from chair movement or otherwise distracting to students, for example from flailing arms? Most mild-to-moderate tics are not disruptive to the school environment, but may be meaningful in how they play out among peers. For a fifth-grader (10 years old or so?) Habit Reversal Therapy may be a better place to start, if the child is enthusiastic.

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