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The NJCTS Tourette Syndrome Program at Rutgers University: A Model Resource for the TS Community

shawn ewbankPresenter:  Shawn Ewbank, Psy.D.
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Dr. Ewbank, clinic director, explained how the NJCTS Tourette Syndrome (TS) Clinic works and the services it provides from counseling to research to training of doctoral students.  Dr. Ewbank went more in depth on the treatments offered at the clinic such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP), and Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention Therapy (CBIT/HRT).

 

Comments(8)

  1. NJCTS says

    Collaborative problem solving, at what age would that be most effective. Is it ever too late?

    • Dr. Ewbank says

      At what age would collaborative problem solving be most effective? Is it ever too late?

      I was actually at a training by the author of this treatment, Dr. Ross Greene, who answered this question. He believed that there was no upper age limit on the treatment and went as far to suggest that collaborative problem solving could even be a more optimal way for adults to communicate. Within our program we have done the treatment for children and adolescents between the ages of 7 and 18. I think that technique is well suited to adolescents because it involves them in finding solutions to situations that lead to explosive outbursts.

  2. NJCTS says

    Can untreated ADHD become more of a problem as the child gets older?

    • Dr. Ewbank says

      Can untreated ADHD become more of a problem as a child gets older?

      It is a bit of a tricky question because the answer can go both ways. Most children (with or without ADHD) experience a decline in impulsivity and hyperactivity as they get older. For some children with ADHD, the decreases here can lead to improvements in motivation and functioning. On the other hand, for higher functioning children with ADHD, age can often bring more challenges. As the demand and expectations for things such as schoolwork increase, it can become harder to compensate for ADHD. A common example of this is a child who does all work at the last minute, but still manages to do well in primary school. However, at some point in middle school, high school or perhaps even college, the amount of work demands better organization and less procrastination. The increased demand can lead to decreases in measured performance.

  3. NJCTS says

    Is the group program you mention the same as the social skills program that you offered?

    • Dr. Ewbank says

      Is the group program you mention the same as the social skills program that you offered?

      No. We have completely rewritten the curriculum and created groups that involve a more comprehensive set of skills. The social skills groups were run for the final time in 2012 and the new group curriculum started in Winter 2013.

  4. NJCTS says

    I like the sound of what your program offers. If my child does not have TS, but OCD/ADHD can they still attend your clinic?

    • Dr. Ewbank says

      I like the sound of what your program offers. If my child does not have TS, but OCD/ADHD can they still attend your clinic?

      Decisions about offering services to children without tics are determined on a case-by-case basis. When we think we can be helpful, we lean toward offering treatment. I encourage you to contact the clinic (848) 445-6111 ext 90150. Please mention that you left this comment on the webinar and I am optimistic that your child would be a good match.

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