The Best Things to Eat if You Have Tourette

We’ve had several entries on the Tourette Blog about what you shouldn’t eat. It’s time for a little positivity!

Today, we take a look at what you should eat if you have Tourette Syndrome. Like all the questions we tackle here on the Tourette Blog, there is no simple answer for those asking about the best things to eat if you have TS.

There is a lot of information out there about what people should or shouldn’t eat in order to be healthy, lose weight, build muscle, etc. etc. It is easy to become confused and to end up with more questions than answers.

The reality is that there no one size fits all diet. You should consult a doctor and possibly a dietician for customized advice to make sure your diet is healthy and that you are taking into consideration any medical issues, allergies or food sensitivities.

On the whole, it is important to eat food that will strengthen your immune system, help keep your blood sugar levels steady and give your body the nutrients it needs. Such foods can include:

  1. Flaxseed, olive or canola oil (contains essential fatty acids)
  2. Blueberries, cranberries or other antioxidant-rich foods (repairs damage, strengthens immune system)
  3. Carbohydrates like legumes, peas, or whole grain cereal (for energy)
  4. Protein including fish, poultry, or natural soy products (helps keep your blood sugar under control and builds your cells)
  5. Water (makes us 60% of your body and almost 70% of your brain)
  6. Non-processed food (higher in nutrients)

It may surprise you to learn that people with TS do not always eat well. On the contrary, one 2015 study found that the individuals with TS that they examined had “unbalanced” nutritional intake. This included not having enough protein intake compared to nutrient intake and inappropriate ratio of fat to carbohydrates.

What is your diet like? Do you eat the foods listed above? Do you eat anything specifically to help with your Tourette?

We want to hear from you!

 

Sources:

Sheila Rogers, Natural Treatments for Tics & Tourette’s:http://www.amazon.ca/Natural-Treatments-Tics-Tourettes-Patient/dp/1556437471

Liang et al. “Evaluation of dietary behavior and nutrient intake in patients with Tourette Syndrome” The Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.http://www.fasebj.org/content/29/1_Supplement/911.16.short

UPCOMING WEBINAR: February 25 on Sensory Issues at Home & at School

THIS WEEK’S WEBINAR

Making Sense of Sensory Issues – How to manage heightened senses at home and in the classroom

February 25, 2015

Presented by Dr. Michelle Miller, Psy.D., a New York State-licensed clinical psychologist who works at Therapy West, a group practice in Manhattan, and as post-doctoral fellow in the Tourette’s Syndrome Clinic at Rutgers University in Piscataway, N.J.

Over the years, parents and teachers have been increasingly attending to childrens’ sensory-related struggles; however, understanding and supporting sensory problems still remains unclear for so many people who work with children. Research also has suggested that 1 in 6 children are significantly impacted by sensory issues, further highlighting the need for this area to be addressed. This webinar is aimed at exploring what sensory issues are, how they look in different children and adults, and what can be done — both at home and at school — to help children with sensory issues thrive.

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UPCOMING WEBINAR: January 21 on Habit Reversal Therapy

THIS WEEK’S WEBINAR

Creative Applications of Exposure Therapy and Habit Reversal Therapy

January 21, 2015

Presented by Dr. Joelle Beecher-McGovern, a clinical psychotherapist at the Child & Adolescent OCD, Tic, Trich & Anxiety Group (COTTAGe) in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy has strong experiential support for a number of psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents. It includes several treatment modalities, including exposure therapy for pediatric anxiety and habit reversal training for tic disorders and trichotillomania. Despite the strong evidence for these treatments, they can be difficult for children and families to implement for a number of reasons, including logistical barriers, motivation issues and difficulties with follow-through in out-of-session work.

In this presentation, Dr. Hilary Dingfelder will briefly describe these treatment modalities and discuss some of the practical issues associated with implementing these treatments with children and adolescents. Dr. Dingfelder will then discuss some creative applications of these strategies to enhance these treatments for children and adolescents. Examples of areas that will be covered include:

  1. How technology can be used to supplement treatment (e.g., using the smart phone to monitor progress or supplement exposures)
  2. How to strengthen reward plans to improvement motivation
  3. Creative ways to enhance exposures with young children (e.g., through the use of games and puppets).

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UPCOMING WEBINAR: November 12 on getting kids motivated for school

THIS WEEK’S WEBINAR

Getting Kids Motivated for School: Strategies to foster your child/teen’s motivation to achieve in school

November 12, 2014

Presented by Dr. Graham Hartke, is a licensed psychologist in private practice in Roseland, N.J.

As our schools continue to increase curriculum, testing, and workload standards, many kids and teens are struggling to stay motivated in school. These are students who do not like school, struggle to complete homework, procrastinate often, have slipping grades, are bored, say they “don’t care about school”, avoid school work, get in trouble, are disorganized, and/or feel disconnected from classroom learning.

This webinar focuses on strategies parents and educators can use to increase student motivation to succeed in school. Strategies will address the causes of low motivation, learning difficulties, improving the homework process, improving organization, and reducing procrastination.

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OTHER UPCOMING WEBINARS

 

Bullying & Vulnerable Populations

November 19, 2014

Presented by Nadia Ansary, Ph.D.

More information about this webinar »

Monsters, Robbers & Nightmares, Oh My! Simple Ways to Improve Your Child’s Sleep

December 3, 2014

Presented by Courtney Weiner, Ph.D.

More information about this webinar »

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List of all NJCTS webinars, including October 29 on mental health in the African-American community

THIS WEEK’S WEBINAR

Mental Health Stigma in the African-American Community

October 29, 2014

Presented by Dr. Christine Adkins-Hutchison, Associate Director of the Office of Counseling and Disability Services at Kean University in Union, N.J.

Asking for help of any kind can be difficult. Seeking psychological services can be even more challenging. For many in the African American community, acknowledging the need for help and pursuing assistance in many forms, especially in the form of counseling, can feel next to impossible.

This webinar will discuss the stigma regarding help-seeking and mental health issues that persists in this ethnic community. How to recognize the need for support, and ways to encourage help-seeking in this population also will be considered.

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OTHER UPCOMING WEBINARS

Getting Kids Motivated for School

November 12, 2014

Presented by Graham Hartke, Psy.D.

More information about this webinar »

Bullying & Vulnerable Populations

November 19, 2014

Presented by Nadia Ansary, Ph.D.

More information about this webinar »

Monsters, Robbers & Nightmares, Oh My! Simple Ways to Improve Your Child’s Sleep

December 3, 2014

Presented by Courtney Weiner, Ph.D.

More information about this webinar »

Continue reading

List of all NJCTS webinars, including October 8 on Tourette in the Asian community

THIS WEEK’S WEBINAR

Mental Health Issues in Today’s Asian-American Community

October 8, 2014

Presented by Dr. Andrew J. Lee

Dr. Lee designed this webinar to provide participants information about the stigma surrounding mental health issues in Asian and Asian-American communities, some cultural factors contributing to this stigma and some suggestions as to how to talk with Asians about mental health issues.

Dr. Lee will cover Asian cultural values that may contribute to the stigma associated with seeking out mental health services, the model minority myth and the negative implications of this myth, the role of ethnic identity and acculturation, and what can be helpful to know in speaking with this ethnic population about mental health issues.

Dr. Andrew J. Lee is the Director of the Office of Counseling and Disability Services, which includes both the Kean Counseling Center and the Kean Office of Disability Services, at Kean University.

REGISTER FOR THIS WEBINAR »

OTHER UPCOMING WEBINARS

Bullying & Vulnerable Populations

November 19, 2014

Presented by Nadia Ansary, Ph.D.

More information about this webinar »

Monsters, Robbers & Nightmares, Oh My! Simple Ways to Improve Your Child’s Sleep

December 3, 2014

Presented by Courtney Weiner, Ph.D.

More information about this webinar »

Continue reading

List of all NJCTS webinars, including October 1 on trade secrets of a Tourette doc

THIS WEEK’S WEBINAR

Trade Secrets of a Tourette Syndrome Doctor

October 1, 2014

Presented by Tolga Taneli, MD

Would you like to learn some great tips on speaking with your child’s doctors?  How about getting them all to collaborate with each other about your child?  Did you ever wonder about the drug approval process?  Learn about this and more in this webinar!

REGISTER FOR THIS WEBINAR »

OTHER UPCOMING WEBINARS

Mental Health Issues? Asians have those? Understanding the stigma surrounding mental health for Asian and Asian Americans

October 8, 2014

Presented by Dr. Andrew J. Lee

More information about this webinar »

Bullying & Vulnerable Populations

November 19, 2014

Presented by Nadia Ansary, Ph.D.

More information about this webinar »

Monsters, Robbers & Nightmares, Oh My! Simple Ways to Improve Your Child’s Sleep

December 3, 2014

Presented by Courtney Weiner, Ph.D.

More information about this webinar »

Continue reading

List of all NJCTS webinars, including September 17 on getting kids motivated for school

THIS WEEK’S WEBINAR

Getting Kids Motivated for School

September 17, 2014

Presented by Graham Hartke, Psy.D.

As our schools continue to increase curriculum, testing, and workload standards, many kids and teens are struggling to stay motivated in school. These are students who do not like school, struggle to complete homework, procrastinate often, have slipping grades, are bored, say they “don’t care about school,” avoid school work, get in trouble, are disorganized and/or feel disconnected from classroom learning.

This webinar will focus on strategies parents and educators can use to increase student motivation to succeed in school. Strategies will address the causes of low motivation, learning difficulties, improving the homework process, improving organization, and reducing procrastination.

REGISTER FOR THIS WEBINAR »

Continue reading

Topamax TS medication wasn’t for me

So for the first time in more than 15 years, I decided to try some medication for my Tourette Syndrome. I had heard about it, and so I decided to give it a try. It’s called Topamax, and fortunately I decided to keep a daily journal of all the positives, negatives and generally how I felt:

Day 1 – 50mg: Not much difference, slight relaxation in tics

Day 2 – 75mg: Body tics noticeably better, face tics same as always. Very tired, bad taste in my mouth, and my heals feel like they are falling asleep (pins & needles)

Day 3 – 100mg: Body tics much better, facial tics remain the same. I have to chew gum to counter act the nasty taste constantly in my mouth. Sometimes I find it hard to focus. I also find myself bored easily

Day 4 – 100mg: Same as yesterday. Foods taste weird. I no longer enjoy the sweet sweet taste of coke and red bull. Sometimes feel a bit jittery. Tiredness beginning to subside. Over all I do like the way I feel aka lack of tics.

Day 5 – 100mg: I constantly lose track of what I am doing. I constantly misspell things. My memory has gotten a lot worse. I hope these side effects even out. My mind no longer races with 50 thoughts at once

Day 6 – 100mg: I find that my OCD is no longer what it used to be as shaving my head and parking my car (perfectly) are both next to impossible

Day 7 – 100mg: A dull headache and frequent sick stomach plague me. Nothing overwhelming but defiantly noticeable. Occasional dizziness, possible depression? Not sure yet.

Day 8 – 100 mg: I sometimes find it hard to talk, and when I am done talking my mind feels “empty”. My whole body buzzes occasionally. My lips tingle. I am starting to miss what makes me “ME” Not sure if this all is worth it.

Day 9 – 100mg: Went to men’s breakfast at church, when it was over we went to go up to the upper building to watch a video but for some unexplained reason I ended up at my parents’ house 15 miles away.

DONE WITH TOPAMAX

Side note — Though I enjoy the feeling of being “normal,” I find it to be quite boring!

List of all NJCTS webinars, including August 13 on 10 ways to make a great school year

THIS WEEK’S WEBINAR

10 Ways to Make a Great School Year

August 13, 2014
Presented by Dr. Michael Osit

Along with an extremely early Labor Day comes a rapidly approaching return to school for your children. Some of you might be dreading it because there are homework, scheduling and chauffeuring challenges that accompany the school year. Others are excited both for your child’s new adventure in learning and for the ensuing break you may need from them. Either way, there are 10 things you can be doing over the final few weeks to help ensure a great school year.

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