Tics sent me to the hospital

Well, as a few if you know, I spent 5 hours at the ER last night. It started with a mild dystonic tic episode that my legs got stuck together and twisted. It took a lot to get them to relax and for me to fall asleep. I thought it was just a fluke — being stuck for 6 hours.

This morning I woke up went to take a bath then felt the urge. Sat down and my legs twisted together again. My ankles feel like they’re breaking. I have Valium and Toredol, but nothing is cutting it. I’m trying to stay positive, but I’m quite miserable. Prayers are appreciated. Thanks! 🙂

10 Ways to Respect Children & Adults with Tourette Syndrome: No. 1

Hey everyone! I have decided to make a blog called “10 Ways to Respect Children and Adults With Tourette’s Syndrome”.

I feel like it’s not just important to tell others what shouldn’t be said, but that it’s also very important to follow this up with things that should be said and things that are helpful and supportive. This is important so that others without Tourette’s don’t shy away from talking about it all together, but instead know ways they can acknowledge Tourette’s by being helpful, supportive and accepting without being offensive.

At long last, here’s No. 1:

Understanding that it is our differences that make us individuals and make life interesting!

From Jennifer, the mother of a child living with Tourette’s:

My 9-year-old with TS had a friend in class write her a card that said how special she thought she was and how she wished she could twirl like she does — that is her “big tic” right now. Her name is Charlie. She’s in 4th grade and has TS, OCD, SPD (Sensory Processing Disorder) and anxiety.

Here are the other nine in case you missed them:

10 Ways to Respect Children & Adults with Tourette Syndrome: No. 2

Hey everyone! I have decided to make a blog called “10 Ways to Respect Children and Adults With Tourette’s Syndrome”.

I feel like it’s not just important to tell others what shouldn’t be said, but that it’s also very important to follow this up with things that should be said and things that are helpful and supportive. This is important so that others without Tourette’s don’t shy away from talking about it all together, but instead know ways they can acknowledge Tourette’s by being helpful, supportive and accepting without being offensive.

So counting down toward No. 1, here is No. 2:

Accepting, not just tolerating.

Look for No. 1 tomorrow. And in case you missed the ones that came before, here’s a list:

10 Ways to Respect Children & Adults with Tourette Syndrome: No. 3

Hey everyone! I have decided to make a blog called “10 Ways to Respect Children and Adults With Tourette’s Syndrome”.

I feel like it’s not just important to tell others what shouldn’t be said, but that it’s also very important to follow this up with things that should be said and things that are helpful and supportive. This is important so that others without Tourette’s don’t shy away from talking about it all together, but instead know ways they can acknowledge Tourette’s by being helpful, supportive and accepting without being offensive.

So counting down toward No. 1, here is No. 3:

Not making any assumptions.

From the mother of a child living with Tourette’s Syndrome:

While my 9-year-old was “squeaking” in a grocery store, we had one person (out of 50) ask if I and if she were OK … out of genuine concern. This is still the first and last time this happened to us. We were both so grateful. Her name is Charlie. She’s in 4th grade and has TS, OCD, SPD (Sensory Processing Disorder) and anxiety.

Look for No. 2 after Christmas. And in case you missed the ones that came before, here’s a list:

“With Tourette, your dreams can come true as well”

Last week, I was in the biggest newspaper of the Netherlands — again! I finally got the time to translate the article, so here it is! The interview was done because a journalist saw the videos of my speeches in Athens, so I’m very proud of that. 🙂

Happy Holidays!

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I’M ALIVE! – ‘With Tourette your dreams can come true as well’

Laura Beljaars has Tourette Syndrome. Her goal is to show other young people that with this disorder, your dreams can come true as well.

By Marion van Es

Many people think that all Tourette patients constantly swear, while in fact it’s just a small part of Tourette patients who have this tic. There are tics that are way more common, but those are apparently not interesting or ‘funny’ enough. Which is too bad, because Tourette is different for every person.

For me it’s hard to filter all the things that go on around me, I have concentration problems and most of the time I’m very tired. When I was twelve, I had about 300 tics every 15 minutes, mostly twisting my eyes and tensing my muscles. Luckily I have never been bullied, probably because I’ve always been very open about my Tourette. Everybody can ask me anything they want.

I’ve always thought that I had to accept that I just couldn’t do everything. I wanted to help children so I started to study psychology, but I had to stop, because it was too much for me at that time. Later I realized that there are a lot of different ways to achieve a goal. I can do anything I want, I just have to take a detour sometimes.

At the moment I’m almost graduating college, to become an elementary school teacher. I would love to help children who have a difficult time at school, for instance because they have Tourette, ADHD or autism. I want to show them, that even with a disorder like this, your dreams can come true.

In April of this year, I had the opportunity to speak at an international conference about Tourette Syndrome. You can see the videos of those speeches at www.tourettelaura.nl. It was very special to show the human side of Tourette like this. Of course it was a bit scary to speak in front of this many important researchers in English, but the message I had, was more important than my nerves.

A lot of young patients hate their Tourette. That’s too bad, because that means you hate something within yourself. There is way more possible for you, then you might think.

I’ve taught many different grades at elementary school, but never did someone make a problem of me having Tourette. If you don’t make a problem of it yourself, most others won’t do that as well.

A lot of people think live is over when you have Tourette, even my mother thought that, back when I was just diagnosed. She says I taught her that this is not true.

10 Ways to Respect Children & Adults with Tourette Syndrome: No. 4

Hey everyone! I have decided to make a blog called “10 Ways to Respect Children and Adults With Tourette’s Syndrome”.

I feel like it’s not just important to tell others what shouldn’t be said, but that it’s also very important to follow this up with things that should be said and things that are helpful and supportive. This is important so that others without Tourette’s don’t shy away from talking about it all together, but instead know ways they can acknowledge Tourette’s by being helpful, supportive and accepting without being offensive.

So counting down toward No. 1, here is No. 4:

Not limiting them to a diagnosis. Instead, giving them the tools and support to reach their highest potential.

Look for No. 3 tomorrow. And in case you missed the ones that came before, here’s a list:

10 Ways to Respect Children & Adults with Tourette Syndrome: No. 5

Hey everyone! I have decided to make a blog called “10 Ways to Respect Children and Adults With Tourette’s Syndrome”.

I feel like it’s not just important to tell others what shouldn’t be said, but that it’s also very important to follow this up with things that should be said and things that are helpful and supportive. This is important so that others without Tourette’s don’t shy away from talking about it all together, but instead know ways they can acknowledge Tourette’s by being helpful, supportive and accepting without being offensive.

So counting down toward No. 1, here is No. 5:

Not pitying them.

Look for No. 4 tomorrow. And in case you missed the ones that came before, here’s a list:

 

10 Ways to Respect Children & Adults with Tourette Syndrome: No. 6

Hey everyone! I have decided to make a blog called “10 Ways to Respect Children and Adults With Tourette’s Syndrome”.

I feel like it’s not just important to tell others what shouldn’t be said, but that it’s also very important to follow this up with things that should be said and things that are helpful and supportive. This is important so that others without Tourette’s don’t shy away from talking about it all together, but instead know ways they can acknowledge Tourette’s by being helpful, supportive and accepting without being offensive.

So counting down toward No. 1, here is No. 6:

Asking questions instead of staring.

From Jenn, the mother of two children living with Tourette’s Syndrome:

I can understand when someone glances over at my children when they tic. A quick glance to acknowledge your surroundings and be sure nothing wrong is occurring is acceptable. However, when you stare too long, it makes things worse.

Not too long ago my daughter was outside of our pediatrician’s office on the ground with full-blown tics. Two people were nearby, one leaving the office and one entering. The one leaving had a child with them. The child said hello. Sam didn’t answer, and the parent made a rude comment about how disrespectful she was for not saying hello in return.

The other parent came toward me and had a look of anger and terror, and asked me what one earth I was doing to my child. I turned to her and said she has Tourette Syndrome and was ticcing. She apologized and walked inside where shortly after she came out to see if we needed anything.

The bottom line is that I was left sad and angry. I wasn’t hurting my child, she wasn’t on display for people to watch as though in a circus nor was she rude. She was, however, in physical and we both were in emotional pain. So to sum it up: People can respect us by not bringing any attention to the fact she has TS.

Look for No. 5 tomorrow. And in case you missed the ones that came before, here’s a list:

10 Ways to Respect Children & Adults with Tourette Syndrome: No. 7

Hey everyone! I have decided to make a blog called “10 Ways to Respect Children and Adults With Tourette’s Syndrome”.

I feel like it’s not just important to tell others what shouldn’t be said, but that it’s also very important to follow this up with things that should be said and things that are helpful and supportive. This is important so that others without Tourette’s don’t shy away from talking about it all together, but instead know ways they can acknowledge Tourette’s by being helpful, supportive and accepting without being offensive.

So counting down toward No. 1, here is No. 7:

Teaching others (your friends, family, peers, co-workers) that different is OK.

From Heather, the mother of a child living with Tourette’s Syndrome:

I am always a bit apprehensive before parent/teacher conferences. Gavin turned 10 on Wednesday, 12/18 and was diagnosed at age 7. Last year, I met with Gavin’s 3rd-grade teacher and, of course, his TS came up. She said sometimes Gavin will jump to his feet in class. The first couple times it surprised her until she realized that it was a tic, so now when Gavin will jump to his feet, she tells the whole class to get up, jump around, turn around and sit down. For me, that was so wonderful to hear. She turned it into a teachable opportunity… to encourage his comfort and self esteem. She didn’t alienate him. She sort of made him to gauge to register “break time.” And that made Gavin a hero!

Look for No. 6 tomorrow. And in case you missed the ones that came before, here’s a list:

10 Ways to Respect Children & Adults with Tourette Syndrome: No. 8

Hey everyone! I have decided to make a blog called “10 Ways to Respect Children and Adults With Tourette’s Syndrome”.

I feel like it’s not just important to tell others what shouldn’t be said, but that it’s also very important to follow this up with things that should be said and things that are helpful and supportive. This is important so that others without Tourette’s don’t shy away from talking about it all together, but instead know ways they can acknowledge Tourette’s by being helpful, supportive and accepting without being offensive.

So counting down toward No. 1, here is No. 8:

Caring enough to educate yourself about what Tourette’s Syndrome is.

From Jocelyn, a mother of a child living with Tourette’s Syndrome:

This is my 12-year-old son. He was diagnosed when he was in 3rd grade. We live in a small town in Texas. Hunter at that time had some very violent neck jerk tics. He was in a lot of pain. The doctors had him on some heavy-duty meds that made him so very tired. He slept during PE, recess and free periods at school. They allowed him to sleep in the nurse’s office. Hunter maintained his A-honor roll status throughout all of this. Our school administrators sought out help to understand Hunter and his new needs. They found speakers to come to our school and explain to Hunter’s classmates what Tourette Syndrome was and how it affected Hunter. They fully embraced Hunter.

I am forever grateful to our school for this. Our church raised money during VBS and gave it to the TSA. All VBS shirts had a teal ribbon printed on them. Our community brought awareness about TS, and awareness brings education, and education helps eliminate judgement. For this, I am grateful. It has made life so much easier for Hunter. We have had teachers attended workshops to understand kids with TS, ADHD, OCD and other co-morbids. They wanted to do this. They sought out these workshops.

Look for No. 7 tomorrow. And in case you missed the ones that came before, here’s a list: